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Digital Heritage 2018 3rd International Congress & Expo
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Friday, October 26 • 9:00am - 12:30pm
Portable Light Domes in PIXEL+: Acquisition, Viewing, and Analysis LIMITED
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshop: Portable Light Domes in PIXEL+: Acquisition, Viewing, and Analysis
Hendrik Hameeuw, Vincent Vanweddingen, Marc Proesmans, Chris Vastenhoud, Bruno
Vandermeulen, Athena Van der Perre, Lieve Watteeuw, Frédéric Lemmers, Luc Van Gool,

Carla Schroer, Mark Mudge, Graeme Earl

Open to all attendees

Since 2003 the multi-light reflectance (MLR) Portable Light Dome (PLD) imaging system is being developed at the KU Leuven, Belgium. After 15 years of progress the engineered acquisition domes and accompanying software solutions comprise of four independent acquisition designs (i.e. 2 sizes: minidome with 260 LED emitters & microdome with 228 LED emitters and 2 types of spectral settings: white light & multispectral (MS)). These devices have been designed to capture both the detailed 3D shape and reflectance properties of artefacts. Thus far, these different PLD modules have already been operated to image, monitor, study, publish and digitally store thousands of various heritage objects located in collections spread around the world. The session will present the abilities and modus operandi of the four systems, including a live demonstration of one of the MS microdomes, and will explore the potentials of this implemented technology for a selection of heritage objects.


Since MLR imaging techniques have been widely used in heritage studies, the second part of the session will focus on the matter of how the by now technologically mature approaches (i.e. PTM-HSH-RTI & PLD) should be brought closer to each other. The initiators of two projects (PIXEL+ and DLN) will formulate solutions for the encountered challenges. They will focus and present their thoughts and strategies on differences in acquisition procedure, rendering, output format, data packing, data validation, ... and long term digital preservation. Thus offering the necessary material and insights to start an open discussion about the future perspectives on how MRL approaches should be integrated to best serve the cultural heritage community’s needs. The session organisers have invited a number of specialists to attend and fuel this discussion.

Format:
The session is organised by Hendrik Hameeuw, Vincent Vanweddingen, Marc Proesmans, Chris Vastenhoud, Bruno Vandermeulen, Athena Van der Perre, Lieve Watteeuw, Frédéric Lemmers, Luc Van Gool and will be moderated by Hendrik Hameeuw and Vincent Vanweddingen. Together with Carla Schroer and Mark Mudge they will present the selected topics, all to fuel the concluding plenary discussion. Together with a number of extra invitees all attendees will be asked to actively participate in this closing discussion of the session.

Structure:
  - Presentation of KU Leuven PLD system (25 min)
  - succeeded by a live demo of the equipment and software (25 min)
  - break (20 min)
  - Pixel+, goals and status (20min)
  - reflection and solutions on creating, processing and validating various sorts of MLR metadata for MLR imaging methods, the Digital Lab Notebook (20 min)
  - panel discussion with all participants (50 min)

Hendrik Hameeuw is a specialist in technical and scientific imaging at the KU Leuven (Belgium). Graduated as an archaeologist (2003) and Assyriologist (2002) Hendrik has participated in archaeological excavations in Syria for many years and has conducted imaging missions in Egypt,
Turkey, multiple places in Europe and the US. In collaboration with KU Leuven-ESAT he was from the start involved in the development of the Portable Light Dome (PLD) system. He has also used RTI and SfM photogrammetry techniques on museum objects and in the field on rock art sites in Sweden and Egypt. Hendrik has coordinated several research projects concerning the development of new multi-light and/or multispectral acquisition systems.


Vincent Vanweddingen is a scientific collaborator at RMAH - KU Leuven (Belgium).
Graduated in 2013 as an electrical engineer, Vincent started working in the computer vision group of ESAT, KU Leuven. He has worked on several 3D reconstruction techniques (Structure from Motion, Structured Light, Photometric Stereo, multispectral imaging) and AI algorithms focussing on reflectance data. For his master thesis, he has written a web based viewer for the PLD system.


Mark Mudge is President and co-founder of Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI) and the current Chairman of the Board of Directors. Since decades Mark has worked in 3D information capture environments and digital photography. Together with Tom Malzbender he is a co-inventor of the Highlight Reflectance Transformation Imaging technique. His work for CHI is focused on the ease of use, cost-effectiveness, and self-documentation of digital imaging techniques through new equipment designs, open source software, and methodology enhancements. Recent efforts focussed on enhancing the trustworthiness of “born archival” images, building up the semantic richness of metadata records about digital representations, and easing the burdens of sustainable, long-term digital archiving.

Carla Schroer leads the training programs at CHI and works on field capture projects with Reflectance Transformation Imaging, photogrammetry, and related computational photography techniques. She also directs the software development and testing activities at CHI, she is a CHI founder and currently holds the positions of Director and Board Member. Carla is a graduate in Computer Studies and spent 20 years in the commercial software industry, directing a wide range of software development projects including Sun Microsystems’ Java technology, object-oriented development tools, and desktop publishing software. She has managed and worked with teams all over the globe, including Russia, India, and Ireland.

Graeme Earl is Professor of Digital Humanities and Vice Dean at King's College London.  An archaeologist by training, he became increasingly fascinated by the ways in which cultural heritage and digital technologies collide and has worked on a broad range of archaeological, digital humanities, digital economy and web science projects.  His areas of interest include: Access to cultural heritage; Recording and analysis of material culture; Digital learning environments and associated policies (e.g. MOOCs, learner analytics, learning spaces design); Digital research infrastructures (e.g. CRIS, OA policy, research data management); and Digitally mediated internationalisation and interdisciplinarity.  Since 2005 he has focused on the port of Imperial Rome, as co-director of the Portus Project., deploying imaging, interaction design, online learning design, augmented and virtual reality, computer vision, accessibility, research repositories, electronic publication, geographic information systems, survey and remote sensing.


Speaker
avatar for Graeme Earl

Graeme Earl

Professor of Digital Humanities, King’s College London
avatar for Hendrik Hameeuw

Hendrik Hameeuw

Advanced Imaging, KU Leuven
Hendrik Hameeuw is a specialist in technical and scientific imaging at the KU Leuven (Belgium). Graduated as an archaeologist (2003) and assyriologist (2002) Hendrik has participated in archaeological excavations in Syria for many years and has conducted imaging missions in Egypt... Read More →
avatar for Mark Mudge

Mark Mudge

President, Cultural Heritage Imaging
Mark Mudge is President and co-founder of Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI) and the current Chairman of the Board of Directors. Since decades Mark has worked in 3D information capture environments and digital photography. Together with Tom Malzbender he is a co-inventor of the Highlight... Read More →
avatar for Carla Schroer

Carla Schroer

Cultural Heritage Imaging
Carla Schroer leads the training programs at CHI and works on field capture projects with Reflectance Transformation Imaging, photogrammetry, and related computational photography techniques. She also directs the software development and testing activities at CHI, she is a CHI founder... Read More →
avatar for Vincent Vanweddingen

Vincent Vanweddingen

RMAH / KU Leuven
Vincent Vanweddingen is a scientific collaborator at RMAH - KU Leuven (Belgium). | Graduated in 2013 as an electrical engineer, Vincent started working in the computer vision group of ESAT, KU Leuven. He has worked on several 3D reconstruction techniques (Structure from Motion, Structured... Read More →


Friday October 26, 2018 9:00am - 12:30pm
Museo Italo Americano @ Bldg C, Ft Mason Ctr Landmark Building C, 2 Marina Blvd, San Francisco, CA 94123, USA

Attendees (32)